The Department of Art & Design and the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts welcome Sawtooth Print Shop for a letterpress workshop on February 8 and 9

Sawtooth Press

Professor Barry Jones included in Design as Art, Art as Design at the Gallery at Greenly Center, Bloomsburg University, Pennsylvania

Austin Peay Art and Design Barry Jones

http://departments.bloomu.edu/art/greenly.html

Haley Crow introducing her work at her senior exhibition.

Haley Crow introducing her work at her senior exhibition.

The Illuminating Past by APSU Amy Dean at the Framemaker

Austin Peay Art and Design

The Framemaker proudly announces the opening of artist Amy Dean’s exhibit: “The Illuminating Past.” This opening reception is part of the February’s First Thursday Art Walk.
 
Amy Dean is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts at Austin Peay State University. According to the artist, “I am making work that responds to earlier, historically important artwork. By studying and conversing with these artists, I find my own work is brought to life.”
 
Dean continues, “Religiously charged images from the 15th century have much to say to a contemporary viewer. In this show I am quoting these historical images and also arguing with them. The casualness of the figures witnessing the horror of the tormented is quite striking to me. In this critique, I am exposing them, turning them inside out and allowing their story to mingle with mine. As it unfolds, the result is always a surprise to me. “
 
The Framemaker is located at the corner of North Second Street and Georgia Avenue.

The Department of Art & Design welcomes Safa Samiezadé-Yazd to discuss Arabic calligraphy, graffiti, street art and urban culture

Austin Peay Art and Design

The Department of Art and Design, with support from The Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts, is pleased to welcome Safa Samiezadé-Yazd to the campus of Austin Peay State University.

Samiezadé-Yazd will be on campus to give a brief introduction into the world of Arabic calligraphy, graffiti writing, street art and urban culture, and the artists, graffiti writers and typographers who keep the tradition alive. In addition to featuring a wide array of photos documenting Arabic graffiti and street art styles, this presentation also explores the traditional elements, modern approaches and socio-political and cultural contexts that have shaped Arabic graffiti movements throughout the Middle East.

Samiezadé-Yazd is currently an associate producer for the upcoming CNN original series “Believer,”hosted by Reza Aslan. Prior to that, she worked at BoomGen Studios, where she worked on numerous outreach campaigns for films both originating from and depicting stories from the Middle East, including Jon Stewart’s directorial debut, “Rosewater,” and the Emmy Award-winning and Oscar-nominated documentary, “The Square.” From 2011 to 2013, she served as the Arts, Culture and Music Editor for Aslan Media, an online youth-driven media source providing alternative coverage of the Middle East and its global diaspora communities. Her writings on Middle East art and culture have appeared on numerous sites, including Art21, Reorient Magazine, Huffington Post and Guardian US. Safa holds a B.A. from the University of Denver and an MFA in Interdisciplinary Art from Goddard College in Middle Eastern art and culture, relational and community-driven art, and performance and intercultural studies.

The lecture will take place Thursday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. in room 401 of the Trahern Building, and is free and open to the public.

For more information on this exhibition, which is free and open to the public, contact Michael Dickins, gallery director, at dickinsm@apsu.edu.

The Department of Art & Design is pleased to present “How Can I Trust You”, Zach Felt’s Senior Exhibition

Austin Peay Art and Design

The Department of Art & Design is pleased to present “mmnnn (walls)”, Haley Crow’s Senior Exhibition

Austin Peay Art and Design

APSU art student Macon St. Hilaire conducts behind-the-scenes research at London museums

Austin Peay Art & Design

The Bayeux Tapestry, a medieval embroidery that depicts the Norman invasion of England in 1066, contains such elaborate details that only a male artist could have produced it. As one critic pointed out, it’s impossible for a woman to have stitched such accurate-looking military weapons and uniforms.

“Excuse me!” Macon St. Hilaire, an Austin Peay State University art student, said recently. “As a military wife, and specifically a woman, I am certainly no expert but have the mental capacity to remember what something looks like, and I imagine women in 1066 had the same level of cognitive ability.”

The famous tapestry was created at a time when artists didn’t identify themselves with their artwork, and after reading one critic’s sexist views, St. Hilaire decided to look into the possibility that women helped stitch some of the great embroideries of the middle ages. In the spring of 2015, she received an APSU Presidential Research Scholar grant, and last semester, she used the grant’s $3,000 award to travel to Europe to examine the works first hand.

“For this embroidery project, I want to understand the stitches used to find if there is a way to determine areas worked by different artisans/crafters, the way that brushstrokes in paintings can be analyzed in determining the painter,” she said.

Several artists likely worked on the 230-foot wide tapestry, and St. Hilaire believes there is credible evidence that some of them could have been women.

“In the Domesday Book, which served as a kind of census, women are listed with land, with embroidery mentioned as something they taught or produced,” she said. “Women often participated in the cottage industries of their husbands or contributed in other occupations, but their husbands would claim it, so it is very unusual and noteworthy to have evidence of specific women.”

Last summer, St. Hilaire developed contacts with curators at some of Europe’s leading museums, and in November, during the Thanksgiving holiday, she flew to London for a week of research. One afternoon, she was ushered into a back room inside the famed Victoria and Albert Museum to examine 700-year-old embroideries within the museum’s private collection. On the back of the fabric, she observed how the old masters made each stitch.

“I had a really great appointment at the Victoria and Albert Museum; I got to put my face practically up on these embroideries to study the stitches,” she said.

While in England, St. Hilaire’s research also took her to The British Museum, The Clothworker’s Center, Durham Cathedral, The Reading Museum and The Ashmolean Museum. At The Royal School of Needlework, in North Yorkshire, she even participated in a goldwork embroidery class.

“A lot of what I do is blend studio art practice with historical research, so I will study this and then try to make it into a contemporary artwork,” she said.

St. Hilaire had planned to view embroidery collections in France and Brussels, but a week before her trip, a massive terrorist attack took place in Paris. The metro stopped running, and museums closed their doors.

“Rachel Qualls, my friend and research assistant, she and I decided that it wouldn’t be wise to get all the way there and possibly not be able to access Wi-Fi to find out if more things were closed or to help us if we got stranded, plus we wouldn’t have been able to eat with the entire city shut down,” she said. “I was disappointed because I had worked for a year building a relationship with the curator of the museum, and I would have had complete access to the textiles in their collection.”

Still, the week in England helped St. Hilaire further her research beyond what she could have done in Clarksville.

“I wouldn’t have had this opportunity anywhere other than Austin Peay,” she said. “I would have to have been in a graduate program. It was totally amazing.”

St. Hilaire will present her research at the University’s Research and Creativity Forum later this spring. For information on other student research at APSU, contact the University’s Office of Undergraduate Research at our@apsu.edu or 931-221-7625.

sthilairebayeux

Dr. Tamara Smithers publishes edited book entitled Michelangelo and the New Millennium

Austin Peay Art & Design

More information can be found here: http://www.brill.com/products/book/michelangelo-new-millennium#TOC_1

Professor Cindy Marsh's exhibition in the Trahern Gallery opened this morning. Don't miss it.

Professor Cindy Marsh's exhibition in the Trahern Gallery opened this morning. Don't miss it.

Spring 16 Schedule of Events

Austin Peay Art and Design

Construction on the new Art & Design Building has begun!

Construction on the new Art & Design Building has begun!

The Trahern Gallery Presents the Work of Professor Cindy Marsh

Austin Peay Art and Design

The Trahern Gallery, with support from The Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts and The Department of Art and Design, is pleased to celebrate the work of retiring professor of art, Cynthia Marsh (Cindy).

As a distinguished professor of Austin Peay State University and an integral member of the Department of Art for the past 18 years, Cindy Marsh will retire at the end of the 2015-2016 academic year.  This celebratory exhibition will focus on both her award winning, socially conscious work with letters and forms, as well as her extensive engagement with community through the use of The Goldsmith Press & Rare Type Collection.  This 60,000-piece collection of 19th century wood type has been used to record community ideas and to promote a contemporary social dialogue based on an historical form of verbal, written and visual communication.

The exhibit opens January 19 at the Austin Peay State University Trahern Gallery and runs through February 12. A lunchtime lecture by the artist will take place in the Trahern Gallery at 11:30am on Thursday, February 11, with a reception to immediately follow.

Cindy Marsh was raised in New England. She received her undergraduate degree in printmaking from Moore College of Art and Design in Philadelphia. She earned an MFA degree from Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York. Her graduate studies focused on the disciplines of printmaking, commercial printing, and photography.

Cindy lived and worked as an artist in Los Angeles from 1973-1995. During that time, she developed an unusual way of constructing images by combining elements of photography, printmaking, and graphic design. Her studio, One Eye Open / One Eye Closed produced limited edition prints and illustrations for the entertainment industry. Printed work from Studio One Eye Open has been exhibited throughout the US, Canada, Europe, and in Japan. Cindy Marsh was a founding member of the Women’s Graphic Center at the Woman’s Building in Los Angeles, California. She was a professor of printmaking and design at California State University, Northridge from 1978-1992 and served as the chair of Communication Arts at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles from 1992-95.

In 1995, Cindy Marsh moved with her family to Clarksville, Tennessee, and served as the chair of the Department of Art at Austin Peay State University from 1995 thru 2003. Professor Marsh founded the Goldsmith Press and Rare Type Collection @ Austin Peay in 1997. Since its inception, the press has received ten regional and national grants including an NEA award in 2006. Currently, Cindy Marsh is a professor of Art and Design and Director of the Goldsmith Press at APSU.

For more information on this exhibition, which is free and open to the public, contact Michael Dickins, gallery director, at dickinsm@apsu.edu.

The art & design construction and renovation has finally begun!

The art & design construction and renovation has finally begun!

The Framemaker presents work by APSU student Sarah Lavender

Austin Peay Art and Design

The Framemaker proudly presents photography by Sarah Lavender. This exhibit is part of Clarksville’s First Thursday Art Walk on January 7, 2016. An opening reception will be held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. The exhibit will remain on display at the Framemaker throughout the month of January during normal business hours (Mon. through Fri. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.).
Sarah Lavender is currently pursuing a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Photography at Austin Peay State University. The artist states that she feels a profound connection with traditional black-and-white photography. The exhibit, entitled “Jade,” is a photographic study of her daughter over the span of her early development. 
The Framemaker is located at the corner of North Second Street and Georgia Avenue, across from the Clarksville Academy.